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A crewman from the F/V McKenzie rose suffered a head injury Saturday.  The incident happened approximately 100 miles west of Coos Bay on the Oregon coast.  The Captain of the vessel radioed the Coast Guard for help around 5:30 A.M.   A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter airlifted the injured crewman to shore for further evaluation and treatment. The current condition of the 26-year-old crewman is unknown.  The facts and circumstances of the incident are unavailable at this time.  Crewman are reminded to wear protective equipment such as hard hats and helmets when there is potential for a head injury.

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Concerns grow as more crewmen have tested positive for Covid 19 aboard American Seafoods Alaska fishing vessels American Triumph and Northern American. Following positive test results for 85 crewmen aboard the American Dynasty last week crewmen aboard the American Triumph and Northern Jaeger were tested this week after arriving in Bellingham, Washington.   Initial reports indicate 21 crewmen aboard the Northern Jaeger tested positive and there were four positive test results aboard the American Triumph.  Both vessels carry 110 crewmen.  The positive testing crewmen have been placed in quarantine.

Under Federal Maritime Law and the Jones Act the employer and vessel owner owes a duty to its crew to provide a safe place to work.  In the situation such as that involving the Covid 19 virus the employer must implement property safety procedures and protocols, testing and modifications to prevent crewmen from being infected with the virus.

Before starting their fishing trips in the middle of June American Seafoods reported they imposed a five-day quarantine on all crewmen and tested all crewmen for Covid 19 and only negative testing crewmen were allowed on the vessels.  Infectious disease medical experts have questioned the effectiveness of the shorter five-day quarantine utilized by American Seafoods, and American Seafoods has now adopted the more widely recommended 14-day quarantine protocol.

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A 31-year-old crewman has been medically evacuated from the commercial fishing vessel Baranoff.  The medivac involved long distance coordination of Coast Guard emergency flight personnel and equipment. At the time of the incident the 196-foot-long Baranoff was located 300 miles northwest of St. Paul Island. The injured crewman was subsequently transferred to Anchorage for medical evaluation and treatment.  The circumstances of the crewman’s injury are currently unavailable.

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85 Crewmen on board an American Seafoods vessel have tested positive for the COVID 19 virus.  The crew are aboard an Alaska fish catcher processor commercial fishing vessel.  The infection has broken out aboard the 272-foot-long American Dynasty.  85 of the 123 crewmen on board have returned positive test results for the COVID 19 virus.  One crewman has been hospitalized while the other crewmen are in quarantine.

The American Dynasty is one of six factory trawlers owned by American Seafoods Company.  The vessels concentrate their commercial fishing operations in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The vessels also fish for hake off the Oregon and Washington Coast.  

American Seafoods’ press releases indicate the crew of the American Dynasty had all been placed in a five-day quarantine and all been tested for the virus before the vessel left for the fishing grounds around May 16, 2020.  All crewman reportedly tested negative for the virus at that time.  In contrast to American Seafoods preemployment five-day quarantine, other fishing companies have been using a 14-day quarantine procedure.

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 An Alaska fisherman has suffered a serious hand injury working aboard the F/V ALASKA DREAM.  The 49 year old crewman was airlifted by the Coast Guard after suffering a serious finger injury.  The risk of infection required fast medical attention.  The incident happened southwest of Kodiak Alaska.  No further details of the injury are currently available.  Crewmen working aboard Alaska commercial fishing boats frequently suffer serious hand and finger injuries.  Proper safety guards and procedures can prevent many of these type of injuries from happening.

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New information is being reported relating to the sinking of the Scandies Rose on New Years Eve.   Sadly five crewmen are now lost and presumed drown. The Coast Guard has identified the missing crewmen as including the vessel Master, Gary Cobban and his son David Cobban. Also among the missing are crewmen Arthur Ganacias, Brock Rainey and Seth Rousseau. The two surviving crewmen were identified as Dean Gribble and John Lawler.

New reports indicate the vessel was heading into gale force winds and was experiencing icing conditions. Icing on vessel of this type can cause added weight and move the vessel’s center of gravity upwards exposing the vessel to loss of stability. The Captain of the Scandies Rose had called friends via satellite phone in the hours before the sinking indicating the vessel was icing and had taken on a list. According to the news reports the Captain did not seem concerned about the icing conditions and was looking for shelter from the storm conditions. Icing conditions are frequently encountered by crab fishing vessels such as the Scandies Rose.

The Coast Guard has indicated they will be further investigating the incident. The Coast Guard casualty investigation will attempt to determine the cause of the sinking and to provide information about how sinkings of this type may be prevented in the future.

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The Alaska crab boat Scandies Rose sank Tuesday night in the Gulf of Alaska.  Search and rescue efforts to find five missing crewmen has been suspended by the Coast Guard.

The Scandies Rose sent a May Day message around 10:00 P.M. on Tuesday indicating they were in need of emergency help. Coast Guard helicopter crews were dispatched to help the seven-man crew of the Scandies Rose.  The helicopters located two Life rafts from the vessel approximately 170 miles southwest of Kodiak. Weather conditions at the scene were described as 40 mile per hour winds with seas of 15-20 feet Two crewmen in survival suits were hoisted from one life raft, the second life raft was empty. The surviving crewmen were taken to Kodiak Hospital for medical assessment.

The 130-foot-long Scandies Rose is a well-known Alaska Crab boat home ported in Dutch Harbor.  Reports indicate the Scandies Rose is managed by Mattsen Management LLC officed in Seattle and owned by Scandies Rose Venture LLC with an official address of Bremerton Washington.

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The Alaska crab fishing vessel Scandies reportedly sank in the Gulf of Alaska late Tuesday night. Two crewmen have been rescued from one of the vessel’s life rafts, and the search and rescue efforts are on for five missing crewmen. The two rescued crewmen have been taken to Kodiak Hospital where they are reportedly recovering from the sinking.

Few details about the sinking are currently known. A mayday message was received from the vessel around 10:00 P.M. and Coast Guard helicopters raced to the last known location of the vessel. Weather conditions were reported to be 40 mile per hour winds with waves of 15-20 feet.   The Scandies Rose is a well known Alaska Crab boat home ported in Dutch Harbor Alaska.

Additional information will be posted here as further details are made available. The Alaska crab fishing industry remains one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.

 

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The Coast Guard has airlifted a deckhand from the Arctic Storm. The crewman was reportedly struck in the head and suffered a severe head injury after hit by a loose crane hook. The 64-year-old crewman was evacuated from the vessel Monday morning and transferred to shore for emergency medical treatment. The incident happened approximately 25 miles of Brookings.

The Arctic Storm is an Alaska catcher processor. The vessel is 334 feet long and carries a crew of 134 commercial fisherman and fish processors. Crewmen injured working at sea on commercial fishing vessels are protected by the Jones Act and the General Maritime Law. Working at sea aboard commercial fishing vessels remains one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.

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A seriously injured Alaska fisherman has been airlifted from the IRENE H.  The injury happened about three miles south of Sitkinak.  Few details of the accident are currently available and the limited information available indicates the crewman suffered an arm injury.  More details will be available from the USCG 2692 casualty report.  Weather conditions at the time of the incident were reported to be 25 MPH winds with 10-12 seas.

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